Re: Adastra Digest, Vol 129, Issue 22

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Re: Adastra Digest, Vol 129, Issue 22

julia
Re swallowtails in Sussex.  I may be one of the guilty "releasers" as I
purchase 5 Painted Lady eggs each year from Insect Lore and  we release them
as butterflies each year about now.  So do lots of local nurseries and
primary schools.  I imagined painted ladies were fairly native so it was OK.
Are we doing wrong?

Julia Macfarlane

-----Original Message-----
From: Adastra [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of
[hidden email]
Sent: 31 May 2017 10:54
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Adastra Digest, Vol 129, Issue 22

Send Adastra mailing list submissions to
        [hidden email]

To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
       
http://lists.sxbrc.org.uk/mailman/listinfo/adastra_lists.sxbrc.org.uk
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When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific than
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Today's Topics:

   1. Re: Swallowtails in Sussex in 2017 (Sarah Patton)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Wed, 31 May 2017 09:49:04 +0000 (UTC)
From: Sarah Patton <[hidden email]>
To: Adastra discussion group <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: [Adastra] Swallowtails in Sussex in 2017
Message-ID: <[hidden email]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

Hi Michael
I have happy memories of rearing through Long-tailed Blues from mange tout
(this vegetarianism is getting tougher...) but, needless to say, they didn't
leave the house. Especially as it was winter ;)?
There was a Map seen somewhere last week. Unfortunately it's very easy to
obtain the early stages of a variety of exotic species and people may think
that they are doing a good thing releasing them :( Then there are the people
who are deliberately trying to establish populations of non native species.
Pity they don't divert their efforts to something which would actually be
helpful.?
I remember the Monarchs well. I was shot down in flames for being a
spoilsport by pointing out that they weren't wild. Oh well.?
And it just goes to show that you get tainted by association - that giant
Palm moth bruiser wasn't even mine ;) I got it from the finder via someone
else! And that now resides safely in the Booth Museum.?There was also a
tiger moth of some sort....that was poo pooed as a release.....until they
started turning up elsewhere.... So there will always be new species
arriving (a new tortrix moth this very week) but the problem with releases
seems to be getting worse.
I'm sure there's a paper in this....Dr Blencowe :)

      From: "Blencowe, Michael" <[hidden email]>
 To: Adastra discussion group <[hidden email]>
 Sent: Wednesday, 31 May 2017, 10:36
 Subject: Re: [Adastra] Swallowtails in Sussex in 2017
   
#yiv9641673179 #yiv9641673179 -- _filtered #yiv9641673179
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72.0pt;}#yiv9641673179 div.yiv9641673179WordSection1 {}#yiv9641673179 Hi
Sarah, ha - yeah, in her defence she was rather new to all of this natural
history malarkey. I don?t think she considered it to be a biological
record.? She was just amazed her caramelised onion polenta pie had turned
into a Swallowtail.  ? I did get the recipe for the pie by the way.  ? I?m
just interested in finding out more about some of the sources of our more
exotic lepidoptera sightings.  ? In recent years we?ve seen some Monarchs
around Sussex which have been the result of the latest ill-informed craze of
releasing these butterflies at Weddings and th
is of course distorts our understanding of the genuine migration of this
species.  ? Last year we received records of the Florida Fern Moth
?Callopistria floridensis in Sussex.  ? And then there was that dodgy record
of that South American Palm Borer moth in Chichester years ago? (I would
insert a smiley / winking face in here Sarah but I don?t know how).   ?
Michael x  ?  ?  ?
|  ? |
|  
|  |

 |  ? ? ?www.sussexwildlifetrust.org.uk  |

??????????????????????????  |

??????From: Adastra [mailto:[hidden email]]On Behalf Of
Sarah Patton
Sent: 31 May 2017 10:09
To: Adastra discussion group
Subject: Re: [Adastra] Swallowtails in Sussex in 2017  ? Pretty weird, but
then am I the only one who thinks it's a little bit questionable to be
reporting a Swallowtail when you know you've just released it??!!  ? S  ?
From: RALPH HOBBS <[hidden email]>
To: Adastra discussion group <[hidden email]>
Sent: Wednesday, 31 May 2017, 9:02
Subject: Re: [Adastra] Swallowtails in Sussex in 2017  ? Very interesting
Michael, but what I can't understand is how a female Swallowtail can have
emerged to lay fertile eggs in France, even in the south, in late March!
Just last week in the south of France first brood Swallowtails were out in
force near the Med, and just starting to emerge at higher altitude. That egg
must have been laid either in south Spain or Morocco(?!) or else both
parents emerged artificially early within a glasshouse (these things happen)
where the parsley plants were raised. Not only that they managed to avoid
death from insecticide,?find one other to mate,?and presumably find enough
nectar to keep them going long enough to start laying eggs.?Curiouser and
curiouser!? Ralph From:"Michael Blencowe" <[hidden email]>
To: "Adastra discussion group" <[hidden email]>
Sent: Tuesday, 30 May, 2017 11:59:50 PM
Subject: [Adastra] Swallowtails in Sussex in 2017  ? Dear Adastrans,  ?
First off a quick thank you to all of you who have purchased a copy of 'The
Butterflies of Sussex' - and for all the lovely comments Neil Hulme?and I
have received. It seems like we got it right.   ? I'm interested in
receiving any sightings of Swallowtail butterflies in the county this year.
Recent years have seen Continental Swallowtails migrating across The Channel
into Sussex and in 2013 some individuals were seen egg-laying which
subsequently led to Sussex-born adults emerging in 2014. There were some
sightings at the end of last year and I am interested to find out if any of
their offspring emerge in 2017.  ? At 06:30 this morning I received an
interesting message from Mary Murphy in Shoreham. Mary reported that she had
aSwallowtail on her balcony. Last week?s warm weather has resulted in a
modest influx of Painted Ladies and migrant moths into Sussex from the
Continent and I wondered if thisSwallowtail had
 been part of the migration or had possibly even survived the winter here. I
called her straight away to get the full story and things were not as I
expected. Instead of flapping its way across The Channel this butterfly had
hitched a lift on a Parsley plant. About 8 weeks ago Mary had bought the
potted Parsley at Brighton?s Infinity Foods. The plant had been imported
from France and unknown to Mary contained aSwallowtail egg. The Swallowtail
was destined to be an unintentional ingredient in Mary?s caramelised onion
polenta pie. The Parsley plant was left on a windowsill and luckily (for all
involved) Mary spotted the small caterpillar before it (and the Parsley)
headed for the pot. With the caramelised onion polenta pie now on the
metaphorical back burner Mary had the consolation of watching aSwallowtail
caterpillar develop, pupate and emerge (an experience which she had to fuel
by purchasing more Parsley plants). The adult butterfly emerged on 29th May
and understandably wanted to get as far away from the oven as possible so
Mary released it onto her sunny Shoreham balcony and the missing ingredient
from her pie flew off today.? Not exactly the sort of sighting I'm after but
it does give us more information on how some of our Swallowtails are
entering Sussex. ?  ? Please send any sightings (whether in?the wild or in?a
supermarket)?to me at my Sussex Wildlife Trust
[hidden email]  ? Michael Blencowe (Henfield)  ?  ?
? ?  ?  ?
| ?  |
|
|   |

 | ? ? ?www.sussexwildlifetrust.org.uk  |

??????????????????????????   |

? ? ? ? ? ? Sussex Wildlife Trust is a company limited by guarantee under
the Companies Act. Registered in England, Company No. 698851. Registered
Charity No. 207005. VAT Registration No. 191 305969. Registered Office:
Woods Mill, Henfield, West Sussex BN5 9SD. Telephone 01273 492630  ?

   
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------------------------------

Subject: Digest Footer

_______________________________________________
Adastra mailing list
[hidden email]
http://lists.sxbrc.org.uk/adastra
http://lists.sxbrc.org.uk/adastra-archives

------------------------------

End of Adastra Digest, Vol 129, Issue 22
****************************************


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Painted Ladies / Snowy Owls

Blencowe, Michael

Hi Julia, thanks for the message.


Painted Lady eggs are commonly sold to allow children to experience the miracle of metamorphosis. The release of these 'home-grown' butterflies in Sussex may account for a small number of records reported to our recording scheme.

I usually weigh this against the hope that some of these children learn to enjoy and appreciate the natural world more through this experience - hey,  maybe a few will even go on to be expert lepidopterists in the future.


Migration patterns and behaviour in Painted Ladies have been the focus of a number of recent studies and we are constantly learning more about this amazing butterfly. When there is a genuine migration of this species into Sussex it results in a number of sightings on a broad front across the county and ties in with suitable weather conditions and the arrival of other migrants.  


In 2009 we estimated 8 million Painted Ladies arrived in Sussex on May 24th alone on one of the most amazing examples of mass migration seen in the county in recent years.

(Now would be the time to confess if this had anything to do with you).


With butterflies such as the Swallowtail and Monarch there is evidence that they are arriving in Sussex under their own steam and, in the case of the Continental Swallowtail, are attempting to remain as permanent residents.

These records are few and far between however - so intentional releases from breeders, brides or bakers can cloud our understanding.


It is valuable to be aware of cultural trends (such as the recent 'butterfly wedding' craze) when recording wildlife.


If I ever see a Snowy Owl in Sussex the first person I'd blame would be Harry Potter.


Michael


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-north-east-wales-18142411









From: Adastra <[hidden email]> on behalf of Julia Macfarlane <[hidden email]>
Sent: 31 May 2017 11:04
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [Adastra] Adastra Digest, Vol 129, Issue 22
 
Re swallowtails in Sussex.  I may be one of the guilty "releasers" as I
purchase 5 Painted Lady eggs each year from Insect Lore and  we release them
as butterflies each year about now.  So do lots of local nurseries and
primary schools.  I imagined painted ladies were fairly native so it was OK.
Are we doing wrong?

Julia Macfarlane

 

 

 

 www.sussexwildlifetrust.org.uk

                          
 
 
 
 

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Adastra [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of
[hidden email]
Sent: 31 May 2017 10:54
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Adastra Digest, Vol 129, Issue 22

Send Adastra mailing list submissions to
        [hidden email]

To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
       
http://lists.sxbrc.org.uk/mailman/listinfo/adastra_lists.sxbrc.org.uk
or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
        [hidden email]

You can reach the person managing the list at
        [hidden email]

When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific than
"Re: Contents of Adastra digest..."


Today's Topics:

   1. Re: Swallowtails in Sussex in 2017 (Sarah Patton)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Wed, 31 May 2017 09:49:04 +0000 (UTC)
From: Sarah Patton <[hidden email]>
To: Adastra discussion group <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: [Adastra] Swallowtails in Sussex in 2017
Message-ID: <[hidden email]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

Hi Michael
I have happy memories of rearing through Long-tailed Blues from mange tout
(this vegetarianism is getting tougher...) but, needless to say, they didn't
leave the house. Especially as it was winter ;)?
There was a Map seen somewhere last week. Unfortunately it's very easy to
obtain the early stages of a variety of exotic species and people may think
that they are doing a good thing releasing them :( Then there are the people
who are deliberately trying to establish populations of non native species.
Pity they don't divert their efforts to something which would actually be
helpful.?
I remember the Monarchs well. I was shot down in flames for being a
spoilsport by pointing out that they weren't wild. Oh well.?
And it just goes to show that you get tainted by association - that giant
Palm moth bruiser wasn't even mine ;) I got it from the finder via someone
else! And that now resides safely in the Booth Museum.?There was also a
tiger moth of some sort....that was poo pooed as a release.....until they
started turning up elsewhere.... So there will always be new species
arriving (a new tortrix moth this very week) but the problem with releases
seems to be getting worse.
I'm sure there's a paper in this....Dr Blencowe :)

      From: "Blencowe, Michael" <[hidden email]>
 To: Adastra discussion group <[hidden email]>
 Sent: Wednesday, 31 May 2017, 10:36
 Subject: Re: [Adastra] Swallowtails in Sussex in 2017
  
#yiv9641673179 #yiv9641673179 -- _filtered #yiv9641673179
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72.0pt;}#yiv9641673179 div.yiv9641673179WordSection1 {}#yiv9641673179 Hi
Sarah, ha - yeah, in her defence she was rather new to all of this natural
history malarkey. I don?t think she considered it to be a biological
record.? She was just amazed her caramelised onion polenta pie had turned
into a Swallowtail.  ? I did get the recipe for the pie by the way.  ? I?m
just interested in finding out more about some of the sources of our more
exotic lepidoptera sightings.  ? In recent years we?ve seen some Monarchs
around Sussex which have been the result of the latest ill-informed craze of
releasing these butterflies at Weddings and th
is of course distorts our understanding of the genuine migration of this
species.  ? Last year we received records of the Florida Fern Moth
?Callopistria floridensis in Sussex.  ? And then there was that dodgy record
of that South American Palm Borer moth in Chichester years ago? (I would
insert a smiley / winking face in here Sarah but I don?t know how).   ?
Michael x  ?  ?  ?
|  ? |

|  |

 |  ? ? ?www.sussexwildlifetrust.org.uk  |

??????????????????????????  |

??????From: Adastra [[hidden email]]On Behalf Of
Sarah Patton
Sent: 31 May 2017 10:09
To: Adastra discussion group
Subject: Re: [Adastra] Swallowtails in Sussex in 2017  ? Pretty weird, but
then am I the only one who thinks it's a little bit questionable to be
reporting a Swallowtail when you know you've just released it??!!  ? S  ?
From: RALPH HOBBS <[hidden email]>
To: Adastra discussion group <[hidden email]>
Sent: Wednesday, 31 May 2017, 9:02
Subject: Re: [Adastra] Swallowtails in Sussex in 2017  ? Very interesting
Michael, but what I can't understand is how a female Swallowtail can have
emerged to lay fertile eggs in France, even in the south, in late March!
Just last week in the south of France first brood Swallowtails were out in
force near the Med, and just starting to emerge at higher altitude. That egg
must have been laid either in south Spain or Morocco(?!) or else both
parents emerged artificially early within a glasshouse (these things happen)
where the parsley plants were raised. Not only that they managed to avoid
death from insecticide,?find one other to mate,?and presumably find enough
nectar to keep them going long enough to start laying eggs.?Curiouser and
curiouser!? Ralph From:"Michael Blencowe" <[hidden email]>
To: "Adastra discussion group" <[hidden email]>
Sent: Tuesday, 30 May, 2017 11:59:50 PM
Subject: [Adastra] Swallowtails in Sussex in 2017  ? Dear Adastrans,  ?
First off a quick thank you to all of you who have purchased a copy of 'The
Butterflies of Sussex' - and for all the lovely comments Neil Hulme?and I
have received. It seems like we got it right.   ? I'm interested in
receiving any sightings of Swallowtail butterflies in the county this year.
Recent years have seen Continental Swallowtails migrating across The Channel
into Sussex and in 2013 some individuals were seen egg-laying which
subsequently led to Sussex-born adults emerging in 2014. There were some
sightings at the end of last year and I am interested to find out if any of
their offspring emerge in 2017.  ? At 06:30 this morning I received an
interesting message from Mary Murphy in Shoreham. Mary reported that she had
aSwallowtail on her balcony. Last week?s warm weather has resulted in a
modest influx of Painted Ladies and migrant moths into Sussex from the
Continent and I wondered if thisSwallowtail had
 been part of the migration or had possibly even survived the winter here. I
called her straight away to get the full story and things were not as I
expected. Instead of flapping its way across The Channel this butterfly had
hitched a lift on a Parsley plant. About 8 weeks ago Mary had bought the
potted Parsley at Brighton?s Infinity Foods. The plant had been imported
from France and unknown to Mary contained aSwallowtail egg. The Swallowtail
was destined to be an unintentional ingredient in Mary?s caramelised onion
polenta pie. The Parsley plant was left on a windowsill and luckily (for all
involved) Mary spotted the small caterpillar before it (and the Parsley)
headed for the pot. With the caramelised onion polenta pie now on the
metaphorical back burner Mary had the consolation of watching aSwallowtail
caterpillar develop, pupate and emerge (an experience which she had to fuel
by purchasing more Parsley plants). The adult butterfly emerged on 29th May
and understandably wanted to get as far away from the oven as possible so
Mary released it onto her sunny Shoreham balcony and the missing ingredient
from her pie flew off today.? Not exactly the sort of sighting I'm after but
it does give us more information on how some of our Swallowtails are
entering Sussex. ?  ? Please send any sightings (whether in?the wild or in?a
supermarket)?to me at my Sussex Wildlife Trust
[hidden email]  ? Michael Blencowe (Henfield)  ?  ?
? ?  ?  ?
| ?  |
|
|   |

 | ? ? ?www.sussexwildlifetrust.org.uk  |

??????????????????????????   |

? ? ? ? ? ? Sussex Wildlife Trust is a company limited by guarantee under
the Companies Act. Registered in England, Company No. 698851. Registered
Charity No. 207005. VAT Registration No. 191 305969. Registered Office:
Woods Mill, Henfield, West Sussex BN5 9SD. Telephone 01273 492630  ?

  
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------------------------------

Subject: Digest Footer

_______________________________________________
Adastra mailing list
[hidden email]
http://lists.sxbrc.org.uk/adastra
http://lists.sxbrc.org.uk/adastra-archives

------------------------------

End of Adastra Digest, Vol 129, Issue 22
****************************************


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Re: Painted Ladies / Snowy Owls

S J Patton
I think the problem is, to the best of my knowledge, the provenance of the eggs involved with the Painted Lady kits. Far better to find native nettle feeders - Peacocks or Small Tortoishells - or even ladybird eggs and rearing them. 
S



From: "Blencowe, Michael" <[hidden email]>
To: "[hidden email]" <[hidden email]>
Sent: Wednesday, 31 May 2017, 12:01
Subject: [Adastra] Painted Ladies / Snowy Owls

Hi Julia, thanks for the message.

Painted Lady eggs are commonly sold to allow children to experience the miracle of metamorphosis. The release of these 'home-grown' butterflies in Sussex may account for a small number of records reported to our recording scheme.
I usually weigh this against the hope that some of these children learn to enjoy and appreciate the natural world more through this experience - hey,  maybe a few will even go on to be expert lepidopterists in the future.

Migration patterns and behaviour in Painted Ladies have been the focus of a number of recent studies and we are constantly learning more about this amazing butterfly. When there is a genuine migration of this species into Sussex it results in a number of sightings on a broad front across the county and ties in with suitable weather conditions and the arrival of other migrants.  

In 2009 we estimated 8 million Painted Ladies arrived in Sussex on May 24th alone on one of the most amazing examples of mass migration seen in the county in recent years.
(Now would be the time to confess if this had anything to do with you).

With butterflies such as the Swallowtail and Monarch there is evidence that they are arriving in Sussex under their own steam and, in the case of the Continental Swallowtail, are attempting to remain as permanent residents.
These records are few and far between however - so intentional releases from breeders, brides or bakers can cloud our understanding.

It is valuable to be aware of cultural trends (such as the recent 'butterfly wedding' craze) when recording wildlife.

If I ever see a Snowy Owl in Sussex the first person I'd blame would be Harry Potter.

Michael

www.bbc.co.uk
A Denbighshire owl sanctuary says it is still feeling the effects of the Harry Potter films, with high numbers of owls being abandoned.








From: Adastra <[hidden email]> on behalf of Julia Macfarlane <[hidden email]>
Sent: 31 May 2017 11:04
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [Adastra] Adastra Digest, Vol 129, Issue 22
 
Re swallowtails in Sussex.  I may be one of the guilty "releasers" as I
purchase 5 Painted Lady eggs each year from Insect Lore and  we release them
as butterflies each year about now.  So do lots of local nurseries and
primary schools.  I imagined painted ladies were fairly native so it was OK.
Are we doing wrong?

Julia Macfarlane

 
 
 
                          
 
 
 
 
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Adastra [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of
[hidden email]
Sent: 31 May 2017 10:54
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Adastra Digest, Vol 129, Issue 22

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Today's Topics:

   1. Re: Swallowtails in Sussex in 2017 (Sarah Patton)


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Message: 1
Date: Wed, 31 May 2017 09:49:04 +0000 (UTC)
From: Sarah Patton <[hidden email]>
To: Adastra discussion group <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: [Adastra] Swallowtails in Sussex in 2017
Message-ID: <[hidden email]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

Hi Michael
I have happy memories of rearing through Long-tailed Blues from mange tout
(this vegetarianism is getting tougher...) but, needless to say, they didn't
leave the house. Especially as it was winter ;)?
There was a Map seen somewhere last week. Unfortunately it's very easy to
obtain the early stages of a variety of exotic species and people may think
that they are doing a good thing releasing them :( Then there are the people
who are deliberately trying to establish populations of non native species.
Pity they don't divert their efforts to something which would actually be
helpful.?
I remember the Monarchs well. I was shot down in flames for being a
spoilsport by pointing out that they weren't wild. Oh well.?
And it just goes to show that you get tainted by association - that giant
Palm moth bruiser wasn't even mine ;) I got it from the finder via someone
else! And that now resides safely in the Booth Museum.?There was also a
tiger moth of some sort....that was poo pooed as a release.....until they
started turning up elsewhere.... So there will always be new species
arriving (a new tortrix moth this very week) but the problem with releases
seems to be getting worse.
I'm sure there's a paper in this....Dr Blencowe :)

      From: "Blencowe, Michael" <[hidden email]>
 To: Adastra discussion group <[hidden email]>
 Sent: Wednesday, 31 May 2017, 10:36
 Subject: Re: [Adastra] Swallowtails in Sussex in 2017
  
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72.0pt;}#yiv9641673179 div.yiv9641673179WordSection1 {}#yiv9641673179 Hi
Sarah, ha - yeah, in her defence she was rather new to all of this natural
history malarkey. I don?t think she considered it to be a biological
record.? She was just amazed her caramelised onion polenta pie had turned
into a Swallowtail.  ? I did get the recipe for the pie by the way.  ? I?m
just interested in finding out more about some of the sources of our more
exotic lepidoptera sightings.  ? In recent years we?ve seen some Monarchs
around Sussex which have been the result of the latest ill-informed craze of
releasing these butterflies at Weddings and th
is of course distorts our understanding of the genuine migration of this
species.  ? Last year we received records of the Florida Fern Moth
?Callopistria floridensis in Sussex.  ? And then there was that dodgy record
of that South American Palm Borer moth in Chichester years ago? (I would
insert a smiley / winking face in here Sarah but I don?t know how).   ?
Michael x  ?  ?  ?
|  ? |

|  |

 |  ? ? ?www.sussexwildlifetrust.org.uk  |

??????????????????????????  |

??????From: Adastra [[hidden email]]On Behalf Of
Sarah Patton
Sent: 31 May 2017 10:09
To: Adastra discussion group
Subject: Re: [Adastra] Swallowtails in Sussex in 2017  ? Pretty weird, but
then am I the only one who thinks it's a little bit questionable to be
reporting a Swallowtail when you know you've just released it??!!  ? S  ?
From: RALPH HOBBS <[hidden email]>
To: Adastra discussion group <[hidden email]>
Sent: Wednesday, 31 May 2017, 9:02
Subject: Re: [Adastra] Swallowtails in Sussex in 2017  ? Very interesting
Michael, but what I can't understand is how a female Swallowtail can have
emerged to lay fertile eggs in France, even in the south, in late March!
Just last week in the south of France first brood Swallowtails were out in
force near the Med, and just starting to emerge at higher altitude. That egg
must have been laid either in south Spain or Morocco(?!) or else both
parents emerged artificially early within a glasshouse (these things happen)
where the parsley plants were raised. Not only that they managed to avoid
death from insecticide,?find one other to mate,?and presumably find enough
nectar to keep them going long enough to start laying eggs.?Curiouser and
curiouser!? Ralph From:"Michael Blencowe" <[hidden email]>
To: "Adastra discussion group" <[hidden email]>
Sent: Tuesday, 30 May, 2017 11:59:50 PM
Subject: [Adastra] Swallowtails in Sussex in 2017  ? Dear Adastrans,  ?
First off a quick thank you to all of you who have purchased a copy of 'The
Butterflies of Sussex' - and for all the lovely comments Neil Hulme?and I
have received. It seems like we got it right.   ? I'm interested in
receiving any sightings of Swallowtail butterflies in the county this year.
Recent years have seen Continental Swallowtails migrating across The Channel
into Sussex and in 2013 some individuals were seen egg-laying which
subsequently led to Sussex-born adults emerging in 2014. There were some
sightings at the end of last year and I am interested to find out if any of
their offspring emerge in 2017.  ? At 06:30 this morning I received an
interesting message from Mary Murphy in Shoreham. Mary reported that she had
aSwallowtail on her balcony. Last week?s warm weather has resulted in a
modest influx of Painted Ladies and migrant moths into Sussex from the
Continent and I wondered if thisSwallowtail had
 been part of the migration or had possibly even survived the winter here. I
called her straight away to get the full story and things were not as I
expected. Instead of flapping its way across The Channel this butterfly had
hitched a lift on a Parsley plant. About 8 weeks ago Mary had bought the
potted Parsley at Brighton?s Infinity Foods. The plant had been imported
from France and unknown to Mary contained aSwallowtail egg. The Swallowtail
was destined to be an unintentional ingredient in Mary?s caramelised onion
polenta pie. The Parsley plant was left on a windowsill and luckily (for all
involved) Mary spotted the small caterpillar before it (and the Parsley)
headed for the pot. With the caramelised onion polenta pie now on the
metaphorical back burner Mary had the consolation of watching aSwallowtail
caterpillar develop, pupate and emerge (an experience which she had to fuel
by purchasing more Parsley plants). The adult butterfly emerged on 29th May
and understandably wanted to get as far away from the oven as possible so
Mary released it onto her sunny Shoreham balcony and the missing ingredient
from her pie flew off today.? Not exactly the sort of sighting I'm after but
it does give us more information on how some of our Swallowtails are
entering Sussex. ?  ? Please send any sightings (whether in?the wild or in?a
supermarket)?to me at my Sussex Wildlife Trust
[hidden email]  ? Michael Blencowe (Henfield)  ?  ?
? ?  ?  ?
| ?  |
|
|   |

 | ? ? ?www.sussexwildlifetrust.org.uk  |

??????????????????????????   |

? ? ? ? ? ? Sussex Wildlife Trust is a company limited by guarantee under
the Companies Act. Registered in England, Company No. 698851. Registered
Charity No. 207005. VAT Registration No. 191 305969. Registered Office:
Woods Mill, Henfield, West Sussex BN5 9SD. Telephone 01273 492630  ?

  
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