dead trees, nightingales...dying nature

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dead trees, nightingales...dying nature

D BANGS
Walking in the Cowfold Stream valley east of Crateman's Farm and to the south to listen to the Nightingales last night we passed lines of oaks with  brown withered crowns. Often the whole foliage of fresh tender leaves and catkins was withered brown, but sometimes the top of the crown was still green.

Amongst them the Ashes, which are co-dominant in this Wealden Clay landscape, had stayed as dead as winter...almost every one.

It was not  a scene of coppery/golden spring leaf green as it had been a few weeks ago, but  a scene of death.

We have noticed how strong the hold of Ash Die Back is in this area since last year and this spring, but the sight of the oaks, now, was dreadful.

Is this just water stress from the drought ? The Stream was flowing and in reasonably good water. I did not notice that the Oaks in the shaws on our walk in to the Stream were affected.

It feels like the ending of the world

Dave Bangs


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Re: dead trees, nightingales...dying nature

Paul Harmes-2
Hi Dave ( from Istria) Late air will do this. It will also cause distortion in the leaves when they do get going
Paul



Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.

-------- Original message --------
From: D BANGS <[hidden email]>
Date: 04/05/2017 09:15 (GMT+00:00)
To: Adastra discussion group <[hidden email]>
Subject: [Adastra] dead trees, nightingales...dying nature

Walking in the Cowfold Stream valley east of Crateman's Farm and to the south to listen to the Nightingales last night we passed lines of oaks with  brown withered crowns. Often the whole foliage of fresh tender leaves and catkins was withered brown, but sometimes the top of the crown was still green.

Amongst them the Ashes, which are co-dominant in this Wealden Clay landscape, had stayed as dead as winter...almost every one.

It was not  a scene of coppery/golden spring leaf green as it had been a few weeks ago, but  a scene of death.

We have noticed how strong the hold of Ash Die Back is in this area since last year and this spring, but the sight of the oaks, now, was dreadful.

Is this just water stress from the drought ? The Stream was flowing and in reasonably good water. I did not notice that the Oaks in the shaws on our walk in to the Stream were affected.

It feels like the ending of the world

Dave Bangs


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Re: dead trees, nightingales...dying nature

Jonathan Crawford
In reply to this post by D BANGS

Hi Paul

 

What is “late air” ?

 

Thanks

 

jonathan

 

From: Adastra [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of pharmes
Sent: 04 May 2017 11:47
To: Adastra discussion group <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: [Adastra] dead trees, nightingales...dying nature

 

Hi Dave ( from Istria) Late air will do this. It will also cause distortion in the leaves when they do get going

Paul

 

 

 

Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.

 

-------- Original message --------

From: D BANGS <[hidden email]>

Date: 04/05/2017 09:15 (GMT+00:00)

To: Adastra discussion group <[hidden email]>

Subject: [Adastra] dead trees, nightingales...dying nature

 

Walking in the Cowfold Stream valley east of Crateman's Farm and to the south to listen to the Nightingales last night we passed lines of oaks with  brown withered crowns. Often the whole foliage of fresh tender leaves and catkins was withered brown, but sometimes the top of the crown was still green.

Amongst them the Ashes, which are co-dominant in this Wealden Clay landscape, had stayed as dead as winter...almost every one.

It was not  a scene of coppery/golden spring leaf green as it had been a few weeks ago, but  a scene of death.

We have noticed how strong the hold of Ash Die Back is in this area since last year and this spring, but the sight of the oaks, now, was dreadful.

Is this just water stress from the drought ? The Stream was flowing and in reasonably good water. I did not notice that the Oaks in the shaws on our walk in to the Stream were affected.

It feels like the ending of the world

Dave Bangs

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Re: dead trees, nightingales...dying nature

vivien.hodge

Hi Dave

 

Wind scorch, and/or salt laden winds are the most likely cause. Trees and shrubs of a variety of genera are suffering in similar way in the Horsham area, the damage in these cases is pretty typical of wind damage. The new shoots of trees near the coast, particularly Acers, are also vulnerable to salt damage when it is carried inland on high winds. It can look catastrophic but they normally recover from one-off events. Year on year damage is however the reason why coastal trees are often stunted.

 

Late frosts will cause similar-looking damage. Damage low in the canopy and not the upper parts could suggest a ground frost.

 

Vivien

 

 

From: Adastra [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Jonathan Crawford
Sent: 04 May 2017 11:08
To: 'Adastra discussion group'
Subject: Re: [Adastra] dead trees, nightingales...dying nature

 

Hi Paul

 

What is “late air” ?

 

Thanks

 

jonathan

 

From: Adastra [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of pharmes
Sent: 04 May 2017 11:47
To: Adastra discussion group <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: [Adastra] dead trees, nightingales...dying nature

 

Hi Dave ( from Istria) Late air will do this. It will also cause distortion in the leaves when they do get going

Paul

 

 

 

Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.

 

-------- Original message --------

From: D BANGS <[hidden email]>

Date: 04/05/2017 09:15 (GMT+00:00)

To: Adastra discussion group <[hidden email]>

Subject: [Adastra] dead trees, nightingales...dying nature

 

Walking in the Cowfold Stream valley east of Crateman's Farm and to the south to listen to the Nightingales last night we passed lines of oaks with  brown withered crowns. Often the whole foliage of fresh tender leaves and catkins was withered brown, but sometimes the top of the crown was still green.

Amongst them the Ashes, which are co-dominant in this Wealden Clay landscape, had stayed as dead as winter...almost every one.

It was not  a scene of coppery/golden spring leaf green as it had been a few weeks ago, but  a scene of death.

We have noticed how strong the hold of Ash Die Back is in this area since last year and this spring, but the sight of the oaks, now, was dreadful.

Is this just water stress from the drought ? The Stream was flowing and in reasonably good water. I did not notice that the Oaks in the shaws on our walk in to the Stream were affected.

It feels like the ending of the world

Dave Bangs

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Re: dead trees, nightingales...dying nature

Paul Harmes-2
In reply to this post by D BANGS
Late frost!!! Don't understand predictive text?



Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.

-------- Original message --------
From: Jonathan Crawford <[hidden email]>
Date: 04/05/2017 11:09 (GMT+00:00)
To: 'Adastra discussion group' <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: [Adastra] dead trees, nightingales...dying nature

Hi Paul

 

What is “late air” ?

 

Thanks

 

jonathan

 

From: Adastra [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of pharmes
Sent: 04 May 2017 11:47
To: Adastra discussion group <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: [Adastra] dead trees, nightingales...dying nature

 

Hi Dave ( from Istria) Late air will do this. It will also cause distortion in the leaves when they do get going

Paul

 

 

 

Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.

 

-------- Original message --------

From: D BANGS <[hidden email]>

Date: 04/05/2017 09:15 (GMT+00:00)

To: Adastra discussion group <[hidden email]>

Subject: [Adastra] dead trees, nightingales...dying nature

 

Walking in the Cowfold Stream valley east of Crateman's Farm and to the south to listen to the Nightingales last night we passed lines of oaks with  brown withered crowns. Often the whole foliage of fresh tender leaves and catkins was withered brown, but sometimes the top of the crown was still green.

Amongst them the Ashes, which are co-dominant in this Wealden Clay landscape, had stayed as dead as winter...almost every one.

It was not  a scene of coppery/golden spring leaf green as it had been a few weeks ago, but  a scene of death.

We have noticed how strong the hold of Ash Die Back is in this area since last year and this spring, but the sight of the oaks, now, was dreadful.

Is this just water stress from the drought ? The Stream was flowing and in reasonably good water. I did not notice that the Oaks in the shaws on our walk in to the Stream were affected.

It feels like the ending of the world

Dave Bangs